Archive for the ‘Chris Farlowe’ Category

P P Arnold & Chris Farlowe @ Solid Silver ’60s Show The Sage Gateshead 19th April 2015

PP Arnold & Chris Farlowe @ Solid Silver ’60s Show The Sage Gateshead 19th April 201560sshowtix
I promised myself some time ago that I wouldn’t go to any more ’60s shows. Too much singing and clapping along to cover versions of great tunes, which often lack the power and energy of the originals. Too many bands with hardly any, or no, original members. But this show featured two artists, who remain true to the soul of the ’60s, and remain artists; namely P P Arnold and Chris Farlowe. What the hell, promises are made to be broken. So along I went to the Sage, making sure to arrive early as both my heroes featured in the first half of the show.
The evening was opened by the New Amen Corner who, although don’t seem to feature any original members of the Amen Corner, are a class act of excellent musicians with a strong ’60s heritage, and play authentic versions of old classics. They are also providing backing to both P P Arnold and Chris Farlowe on this tour. Tonight they played “Bend Me, Shape Me” and the Turtles “Eleanor” before welcoming PP Arnold to the stage. After an embarrassing false start during which New Amen Corner played the intro to “Angel of the Morning” several times and PP didn’t arrive on stage as expected …. she finally did join us, and apologised explaining that she was waiting back stage and hadn’t heard her call. PP is the mod ace face soul sister, who arrived in the UK as an Ikette backing Ike and Tina Turner on a Stones’ tour, and was then asked by Mick Jagger to stay on and become a solo artist. She then formed a strong bond with Steve Marriott and the Small Faces, and performed with them on classics like “Tin Soldier”. This lady has class. She started with “Angel of the Morning”, and then sang Steve Wonder’s “Uptight.” Great stuff. Next she talked about how she recorded with the Bee Gees, singing “To Love Somebody” which PP covered on one of her albums. 60sprogThe next song was “If You Think You’re Groovy” which was written for her by Steve Marriott and Ronnie Lane; I think the Small Faces also backed her on the single. She dedicated the song to Marriott and the rest of the Small Faces. “River Deep, Mountain High” was dedicated to Tina Turner, who started PP off on her career. PP was suffering from a bad cold and was drinking ginger and honey to help her throat, but still sounded great. She then explained how after the Stones tour Mick Jagger invited her for a walk in Regents Park where he “made a proposition to her”. The “proposition” was of course to become a solo artist and join the new Immediate record label which was being launched by Andrew Loog Oldham, the Stones’ manager, and which also featured Chris Farlowe and the Small Faces. This was as way of introduction to her first hit single, which was Cat Steven’s “The First Cut is the Deepest”. Excellent.
PP was then joined by Chris Farlowe for a duet of “Private Number”, introducing Chris as “the Voice”, and demonstrating the high regard in which he is held by fellow artists. Chris then launched into a set of soul and R’n’B classics: “Giving it Up for your Love”, “Stand By Me” were first. He then introduced a new song “Don’t Want to Love You Anymore” before performing “Handbags and Gladrags” as only Chris Farlowe can. Marriott featured again, as Chris dedicated “All or Nothing” to the legend. There was one song left that just had to be sung; he finished with a great rendition of “Out of Time” (No. 1 for Chris in 1966).
The final act in the first half of the show was ’60s stars the Merseybeats with their familiar trademark Gibson Firebird guitars, and featuring original members Bill Kinsley and Tony Crane. These guys had some hits, and some great songs “back in the day”. Their set was: “Just a Boy from Liverpool”, “Wishin’ and Hopin'” (No.13, 1964), “Hey Baby” (introduced as a favourite back in the days of the Cavern lunchtime spots), “Don’t Turn Around” (No. 13, 1964), a cover of Del Shannon’s “Runaway”, the Everly’s (“their is only ever one duo”) “Let it Be Me”, “Singing the Blues”,  and “I Think of You” (No. 5, 1963). They closed with “Sorrow”, which they recorded as the Merseys (reached No.4 in 1966) and which was covered by David Bowie (No. 3, 1973). The Merseybeats returned for an encore of “Hi Ho Silver Lining”.
I’d had my ration of ’60s nostalgia for the evening, so left after the first half, missing Mike Pender’s Searchers and Billy J Kramer (sorry).
The old ones can still be the best (at least they seem so; to an old guy like me 🙂 ).

Advertisements

Great British R&B Festival Colne August 26th 2013. Chris Farlowe, Climax Blues Band, The Pretty Things, and Wilko Johnson

Great British R&B Festival Colne August 26th 2013. Chris Farlowe, Climax Blues Band, The Pretty Things, and Wilko Johnson
band Marie and I spent the bank holiday Monday afternoon at the Great British R&B Festival, which is held each year in Colne, Lancashire. Yesterday afternoon’s line-up was particularly strong, featuring Chris Farlowe, Climax Blues Band, The Pretty Things, and Wilko Johnson on the International Stage which is in the Municipal Hall on the main street.
The Norman Beaker Band opened the proceedings at 2pm. Or rather the proceedings were actually opened by the crazy compare, wearing a fluorescent suit and hat. The guy did a great job on introducing the bands, changing his suit and hat throughout the day, getting more and emore outrageous as the day went on. Norman and the guys played a couple of songs before they were joined by Chris Farlowe. It’s a few years since I saw Chris. His voice was as soulful as ever, and the years haven’t diminished his energy or style. They played a set of favourites including Stormy Monday Blues; Tough on you, Tough on me; The Small Faces’ hit All or Nothing, and Handbags and Gladrags. They closed with (of course) his big hit Out of Time. The guy remains a master of R&B. Pure class and a great way to start the day.
Next up was The Climax Blues Band. Now if its a few years since I saw Chris, it’s even longer since I saw these guys in concert. In fact I think the last time I saw them was probably I the mid 70s. The line-up has changed many times over the years, with no-one remaining from the early days of the band. The current band continues the Climax traditional of recreating an authentic Chicago blues sound. We slipped out for something to eat,but got back in time to catch the end of their set, including their hit single Couldn’t Get It Right. colneprog The Pretty Things are a big favourite of mine, and they never let me down. The current line-up of the band features originals Phil May on vocals, tambourine and maracas, and Dick Taylor on guitar, along with long standing Pretty Frank Holland on guitar and mouth organ. They started the set with a couple of old R&B tunes, and the classic Cries From the Midnight Circus. Phil then explained that, although it was a blues festival, they had to play something from their classic album S F Sorrow. So next up was S F Sorrow is Born and She Says Good Morning. The three front men then switched to acoustic mode to sing a couple of old blues: Come on in my Kitchen, and Little Red Rooster, featuring some excellent slide guitar from Dick, growling vocals from Phil and great blues harp courtesy of Frank. These guy know how to sing the blues, and they just held the place spellbound. Then it was back to their old rock roots for Mona, and Midnight to Six Man. Great stuff. The Pretty Things were swiftly followed by the great Wilko Johnson. Wilko’s situation has been well documented, and his recent appearances have apparently all been joyous celebrations of his music and legend. Thankfully Wilko is still able to play and, in his own words: ‘It seems that I am still being spared the final onslaught of my terminal cancer. As the memory of the Farewell Tour recedes I am feeling again the desire to get up on stage and do my thing while health allows – so it is that I have decided to make some festival appearances during during the summer’. wilko He had asked specially to play at the festival, having done so several times in the past, and everyone present yesterday was delighted to see him. First Wilko was presented with an award for British Blues legend, he then started his set with the Feelgood’s song All Through the City, and also included the Feelgood classics Going Back Home, Roxette, Back in the Night and She Does It Right. The crowd clearly love the guy, and it was a very emotional show, with Wilko strutting his stuff back and forth across the stage, chopping away at his telecaster with those familiar riffs. Its many years since I’ve seen Wilko in concert and I felt privileged to have the opportunity to do so once more. I must also mention Norman Watt-Roy whose bass playing was simply stunning. Again, its many years since I’ve seen Norman perform, probably since I he was with Ian Drury and the Blockheads. The encore was a very emotional Bye Bye Johnny, with everyone waving Bye Bye to Wilko. The crowd were on their feet for a full 5 or 10 minutes after he finished, giving him a real standing ovation. Strong stuff.
We left after Wilko’s set, and drove back up north to pick Laura up and then return home.

Chris Farlowe in concert

Chris Farlowe in concert
chris2 Chris Farlowe is one great singer. I would put him alongside the greats (for me): P J Proby, Steve Ellis, Steve Marriott, Joe Cocker, Frankie Miller, Paul Rodgers, Rod Stewart, Robert Plant. I first saw him when he was being a rock star as vocalist on Atomic Rooster. He was only in the band for a short period during 1972 and possibly 1973, and I was lucky enough to see them at Sunderland Locarno. It seemed a strange match, but worked well. The next time I saw him was at the City Hall with my mate Will. This gig was billed as Chris Farlowe and Friends and was poorly attended, Chris wasn’t really seen as being “cool” at the time. However, he was amazing, and we came away as converts. A live lp exists from that period and shows his setlist as being: We’re Gonna Make It; Rhyme And Time; Peace Of Mind; After Midnight; Only Women Bleed; Mandy; Hot Property; Handbags & Gladrags; You Haven’t Done Nothin’; It Ain’t No Use. chris1 There are quite a few titles that I don’t recognise there, but I definitely remember him singing Mandy, Only Women Bleed and Handbags & Gladrags. It interesting that Out of Time is not listed. His band for the live album is listed as backing vocals – Joanne Williams, Madeline Bell; Bass – Pat Donaldson; Drums – Gerry Conway; Guitar – Albert Lee; Horns – Chris Mercer, Ron Carthy; and Keyboards – Jean Roussel. I do recall the great Albert Lee being on guitar at that gig, but can’t be certain about the rest of the band. I wonder if Madeline Bell was there; I have always been a great fan of Madeline, and I wasn’t sure if I have ever seen her. Maybe I saw her that night. chris3 Anyway it was great gig, and that night I realised just how good Chris was that night. Since then I’ve seen Chris a few times, including a couple of gigs at Newcastle Tyne Theatre some years ago. At one of those gigs, Marie and I chatted to Chris in the bar, and he signed my ticket. Chris is often backed by The Norman Beaker Band who are an excellent blues band. Favourites of mine are Handbags and Gladrags, Out of Time, and he does great versions of The Stones Paint It Black and The Small Faces All or Nothing. Long may he rock.

Solid Silver 60s show The Sage Gateshead 1 March 2011

Solid Silver 60s show The Sage Gateshead 1 March 2011
Hi,this is Will, Peters occasional concert going mate writing this time. Peter couldn’t make this concert ‘The Solid Silver 60’s show’, so I took along my 21 year old son Jack (not exactly a fan of 60’s music excepting The Beatles and Hendrix) who wanted to experience the Sage for the first time.
Vanity Fare were on first and were ok, doing the odd tune I slightly remembered like ‘Hitchin’ A Ride’.They stayed on to support all the solo acts who appeared. Things started to liven up with the appearance of Wayne Fontana who had the audiences in stitches with his banter and stories.He was kitted out in a white stetson and suit and was in fine voice effortlessly belting out his hits such as ‘Pamela Pamela’.Next up was Chris Farlowe. Jack and I both agreed he was the best vocalist in the show, our favourites being ‘Handbags and Gladrags’ and ‘Out of Time’. He made us laugh about the time in the early 60’s how he and his backing band travelled from London up to Newcastle to play a one off gig. They were paid £20 and after they had deducted the petrol and the oil (they were using more oil than petrol) money out, they counted out their wages, which amounted to £1.10p each! Dave Berry was really good, recounting his Northern experiences and performing a version of the ‘Crying Game’ as though it was fresh and new. We didn’t really rate Terry Silvester (Hollies) or the Merseybeats in the same league as the previous acts, but all in all an entertaining night!

ticket


programme


Will got the programme signed by Chris Farlowe and Wayne Fontana. (Good man Will; Thanks). Here is Chris' autograph