Archive for the ‘David Gates’ Category

David Gates 1980 and 2001

David Gates 1980 and 2001
davidgates I’ve already blogged on David Gates alongside Bread, but I found a programme in my collection that I hadn’t scanned at the time, so I decided to include it today for completeness and as an excuse for writing a little more about David and his songs. David has written some great songs including the Bread classics: Make It With You; Baby I’m-A Want You; Guitar Man; Everything I Own; and If. What I didn’t realise was that he also wrote Saturday’s Child for the Monkees. Saturday’s Child appears on the Monkees first lp, and is one of their better album tracks. In the TV series our heroes Monkee around on the beach in a dune buggy, motorbikes, and the Monkeemobile! Happy memories. The last time I saw David Gates in concert was at a gig at Newcastle Tyne Theatre which Marie and I went to ten or more years ago. He was on good form, and sang all the classic Bread songs, as you would expect.

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Bread (David Gates)

Bread (David Gates)
Bread have some pretty top songs. I remember being very excited about getting the chance to see them when they came to Newcastle City Hall in 1978. Marie and I went along and were just overwhelmed by those beautiful songs: “Make It with You”, “Everything I Own”, “Baby I’m-a Want You”, “If”, “Guitar Man”; each one a classic. The band were back again in 1980. Looking back at the tickets form those gigs tells its own story. The 1978 gig was billed as “David Gates and Bread”. However, by 1980 the ticket read: “David Gates, Larry Knechtel, Michael Botts and guests”. This was as a result of a dispute over use of the name “Bread”. The truth is that all of those great songs were written by David Gates, so as long as David was in the line up a great concert was guaranteed. David continues as a solo artist and came to Newcastle Tyne Theatre around 10 years ago. The concert was good, and covered all the classics as anticipated, although David’s set was quite short (and the tickets relatively expensive).